Silicon Valley and the Rise of the Disneypreneur

image0... Disneypreneurs are not the same thing aswantrapreneurs. You see more of the second type, especially on the East Coast, and it’s easy to conflate the two, but the socioeconomic distance is vast. The wantrapreneur can talk a big game, but lacks the drive, vision, and focus to ever amount to anything. He’s the sort of person who’s too arrogant to work for someone else, but can’t come up with a convincing reason why anyone should work for him, and doesn’t have the socioeconomic advantages that’d enable him to get away with bullshit. Except in the most egregious bubble times, he wouldn’t successfully raise venture capital, not because VCs are discerning but because the wantrapreneur usually lacks sufficient vision to learn how to do even that. Quite sadly, wantrapreneurs sometimes do find acolytes among the desperate and the clueless. They “network” a lot, sometimes find friends or relatives clueless enough to bankroll them, and produce little. Almost everyone has met at least one. There’s no barrier to entry in becoming a wantrapreneur.

Like a wantrapreneur, Disneypreneurs lack drive, talent, and willingness to sacrifice. The difference is that they still win. All the fucking time. Even when they lose, they win. Evan Spiegel (Snapchat) and Lucas Duplan (Clinkle) are just two examples, but Sean Parker is probably the most impressive. If you peek behind the curtain, he’s never actually succeeded at anything, but he’s a billionaire. They float from one manufactured success to another, build impressive reputations despite adding very little value to anything. They’re given the resources to take big risks and, when they fail, their backers make sure they fail up. Being dropped into a $250,000/year VP role at a more successful portfolio company? That’s the worst-case outcome. Losers get executive positions and EIR gigs, break-evens get acqui-hired into upper-six-figure roles, and winners get made.

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